Foster a Greyhound Today

Fostering means taking a retired racing greyhound from the track after they have been spayed or neutered into your home to acclimate the dog to life after racing.  It may last from one  week to several months depending on the specific situation.  The foster family is expected to:

1.       Housetrain the greyhound which should not be difficult since the dogs have been trained already not to soil in their crate.

2.       Teach the dog to cope with new things like sliding glass doors, slippery tile floors, television, other animals and even stairs if they are present.

3.       Show the dog how to play as their past racing life is all business so time needs to be taken to introduce stuffed animals which are enticing to greyhounds and letting them learn that toys squeak and are fun.

4.       Teach basic obedience commands like “no”, “stay” and “come”.  Keep in mind greyhounds do not sit due to their physical structure and a firm voice tone is all that is needed for obedience training.

The foster family will be given any medications necessary for the greyhound including heartworm and flea/tick  preventative.  Any other medical costs that arise need to be approved by GPA as the cost will be GPA’s responsibility.  The foster family will be responsible for food costs and is expected to feed a quality dog food twice per day as well as provide the dog with a soft bed since greyhounds do not lie on hard surfaces due to their body shape. 

As the greyhound adjusts to its new surroundings, their personality will begin to emerge.  Completing a foster report card form that is provided will profile the dog’s personality and help with providing information for the permanent adoption.  The hardest part of fostering is giving up the greyhound to its new home but as foster parent, you have the option of keeping your foster dog as a permanent adoption for your family.